Valahian Journal of Historical Studies Cover Image

Valahian Journal of Historical Studies
Valahian Journal of Historical Studies

Publishing House: Editura Cetatea de Scaun
Subject(s): History
Frequency: 2 issues
ISSN: 1584-2525
Status: Later issues not available

  • 2004
  • 2005
  • 2006
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • Issue No. 1
  • Issue No. 2
  • Issue No. 3-4
  • Issue No. 5-6
  • Issue No. 7-8
  • Issue No. 09
  • Issue No. 10
  • Issue No. 11
  • Issue No. 12
  • Issue No. 13
  • Issue No. 14
  • Issue No. 15
  • Issue No. 16
  • Issue No. 17
  • Issue No. 18-19
  • Issue No. 20
{{ issueInfo.Volume }}/{{ issueInfo.Year }} Cover
  • Year: {{ issueInfo.Year }}
  • Volume: {{ issueInfo.Volume }}
  • Number: {{ issueInfo.IssueNo }}

Articles list
{{ article.TitleEnglish }}

{{ article.TitleOriginalLanguage }}
({{ article.TitleEnglish }})

  • Price: {{ common.currency(article.Price) }}
Short Description

The Valahian Journal of Historical Studies is acting under the patronage of the Grigore Gafencu Center for the History of International Relations of the State University Valahia in Târgovişte. It is dedicated to a better knowledge of the modern and contemporary history. As the interest for writing and reading in this history study field is obviously increasing, the initiative of this journal is both a response and a stimulant for all historians in search for an additional chance to have their scholarly materials published and acknowledged by the community of fellow historians. The initiative to speak with a distinct voice has originated among our fellow historians in the Department of History of the Faculty of Humanities in our university, but the goal we promise to achieve is broader than a local one. By this journal we encourage a closer and larger dialogue with other Romanian and foreign historians interested in opening up new opportunities to disclosure new sources launching new viewpoints and ideas concerning the modern and contemporary historical developments. The undeniable need for intensifying such a dialogue is suggested not only by the necessary return to a more complete spectrum of documentary information. We clearly have to appeal to more basic domestic and foreign sources and we also realize the compulsion to enlarge the context of our studies of the more recent past from the national to European and world perspective. A comparative approach is also beneficial in every respect as we are eager and honored to open our pages to all both senior and young historians engaged in studies on political, economic, social, intellectual studies in the field. Materials on the history of international relations are also welcomed along with any reviews in other published books and articles calling attention.