Three perspectives on interpreters and stress: The experts, the novices, and the trainees Cover Image
  • Price 3.00 €

Three perspectives on interpreters and stress: The experts, the novices, and the trainees
Three perspectives on interpreters and stress: The experts, the novices, and the trainees

Author(s): Heather Adams, Ligia Rosales-Domínguez
Subject(s): Language studies, Language and Literature Studies, Theoretical Linguistics, Philology
Published by: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego
Keywords: interpreting; stress factors; experts; novices; trainees
Summary/Abstract: That interpreting causes stress is hardly a new idea. Our intention in the present chapter, in the context of literature that looks at stress in foreign language learners and interpreting students, is to look at factors that induce stress in interpreters at different stages of their professional careers and/or training. Hence, we carried out a small-scale study in which we posed a number of questions in this field to expert conference interpreters (with eight or more years’ professional experience as such), “novice” interpreters (with less experience in simultaneous or consecutive interpreting but with a certain level of experience in liaison interpreting), and final-year students of a translation and interpreting degree, who had successfully completed at least one year of interpreting studies. The results obtained give an idea of the main stress-inducers in each group, and can be particularly useful for curricular design and teaching practice at different stages of competence development.

  • Page Range: 60-71
  • Page Count: 12
  • Publication Year: 2017
  • Language: English