Migrant associations as alternative jobs providers: Experience of Turkish and sub-Saharan communities in Belgium Cover Image

Migrant associations as alternative jobs providers: Experience of Turkish and sub-Saharan communities in Belgium
Migrant associations as alternative jobs providers: Experience of Turkish and sub-Saharan communities in Belgium

Author(s): Altay Manco, Andrea Gerstnerova
Subject(s): Politics / Political Sciences, Social Sciences, Economy, Geography, Regional studies, Labor relations, Nationalism Studies, Economic development, Migration Studies, Ethnic Minorities Studies
Published by: Transnational Press London
Keywords: Economic integration; immigration; community life; sub-Saharan Africans; Turks; Belgium;

Summary/Abstract: It can be said that Belgian labour market has been challenged since the 1970s due to changing economic landscape. The two major drivers for change were the deindustrialization and globalization. For some, these two drivers have brought a perceptible deterioration of working conditions and pay. In general, foreign workers are among the first to be affected by such changes. Their temporary residence status, unrecognized qualifications, limited language skills and lack of access to the social networks of the native-born Belgians make them particularly disadvantaged in the labour market. In order to overcome these obstacles, migrant communities have developed various, more or less effective, measures. To illustrate this, this paper discusses the role of migrant associations in economic integration among the Turkish and the sub-Saharan communities residing in Belgium. Particular emphasis is made on the contribution of the community’s social capital in the process of transferring knowledge, financial and material means and professional networks. The social capital that sub-Saharan and Turkish communities dispose is of great help to immigrants. It can ease their adaptation into the new socioeconomic environment in material, financial and psychological terms. However, to some extent, the mobilization of the community’s social capital can also incite the development of parallel societies that are in contrast to the ideal conception of a cohesive society. The adherence to the legislative framework of the host society may also be questioned. The occurrence of informal activities within the migrant associations is not infrequent.

  • Issue Year: 6/2016
  • Issue No: 1
  • Page Range: 1-15
  • Page Count: 15
  • Language: English