L’inventaire funéraire - une source informative ou/et indice social et symbole religieux, (Base sur les matériels des nécropoles du Ier millénaire av. Cover Image
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L’inventaire funéraire - une source informative ou/et indice social et symbole religieux, (Base sur les matériels des nécropoles du Ier millénaire av.
L’inventaire funéraire - une source informative ou/et indice social et symbole religieux, (Base sur les matériels des nécropoles du Ier millénaire av.

Author(s): Ion Niculiţă, Tudor Arnăut
Subject(s): History
Published by: Editura Istros - Muzeul Brailei
Keywords: eastern Carpathians; 1st millennium BC; funerary inventory

Summary/Abstract: The complexity of sepulchral constructions, the diversity of funeral inventory and their significance have continuously stayed in viewfinder of archaeologists, anthropologists and sociologists, causing countless discussions that have found reflection in many monographs and special studies occurring at the end of XX - early XXI centuries. The earliest of them Saharna-Ţiglău, Saharna-Hulboaca, Alcedar, Climăuţii de Jos fit largely during the period of 10th century-the first half of 8th century BC. Most of them are necropolises of tumuli type. Some of them contain burials marked with rings of unwrought stone pieces above which stand small mounds of broken stone. In some cases burials are practiced in the center of the ring, in others- in stone slabs graves. The inventory, usually, is presented by various jewel pieces: bracelets, bronze earrings, iron fibulae, iron knife blades and various forms of clay pots with incised and stamped decorations. But the absent of weapons can lead to the idea that they did not belong to military class. Necropolises of tumuli type with mantle of unwrought stone are prevailing in the next period, 7th-5th centuries, known after discoveries from Drumul Feteştilor, Valovăţ, Cajvana etc. But they contain weapons: akinakai, arrow and spear tips- inventory that permits their attribution to exponents of military aristocracy. In the 4th-3rd centuries are frequent flat cemeteries with rectangular sepulchral constructions in shape of pits packed with burnt wooden beams with rich inventory: such as akinakai, spear tips, bridles, iron bridles bits from Pîrjolteni - inventory which indicates the membership of a wealthy military. The analysis of sepulchral constructions and inventory in this case allows us to understand that the absent of armament does not prove that the graves with rings and mantles of stone do not belong to community leader that have not to be a military one. In most cases funerary inventory reflects the social status of the defunct, but not always. Thus, in an ordinary burial was found a gold pyramidal earring, a few pots and more nothing. There are known tumuli cemeteries in which are found only jewel pieces. In such cases, the inventory does not give any information about the social status of the deceased. Certainly, the funerary materials are not able to illustrate adequately the stratification of society, but in correlation with other data they can substantially contribute to the study of social structure of communities from 1st millennium BC.

  • Issue Year: 16/2010
  • Issue No: 1
  • Page Range: 185-206
  • Page Count: 22
  • Language: French