The Silent Movie Culture of the Russian Films in the 1910s. The excessively human tragicomedy of Russia preceding the revolution. Cover Image
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Az 1910-es évek orosz némafilm-kultúrája. A forradalom előtti Oroszország túlságosan is emberi tragikomédiája
The Silent Movie Culture of the Russian Films in the 1910s. The excessively human tragicomedy of Russia preceding the revolution.

Author(s): Anna Varga
Subject(s): Film / Cinema / Cinematography, Sociology of Art
Published by: Eszmélet Sajtó Alapítvány
Keywords: Film analysis; Silent film; black and white film; melodrama; russian film; Yevgeni Bauer; Pyotr Chardynin; Vasily Goncharov; Yakov Protazanov; Vladimir Romashkov; Cheslav Sabinsky; Vyacheslav Viskovsky; Vera Kholodnaya; Sten'ka Razin
Summary/Abstract: American melodrama targets eternity, while Russian melodrama targets nothing. In this respect it can be stated, that the Russian silent movie in the 1910s was remarkably modern. The concentration of the motives of unbearable existence, scandals, being betrayed, and collapse result in an aesthetic vacuum. By the end of the films we get to experience the exhaustion of time: "time stops". In this vacuum, for the rebellion of life the only possible way to return to time is found in the question "What shall we do?" The young motion picture demands time in motion. According to the author, the particular situation of the "sacred" and "demonic" Russia one hundred years anticipated the universal situation of humankind today. In the long disappeared artistic golden age we can find the alternatives of today and tomorrow. The analyses of the films, whose modernity will never die, are a variation on the theme by Walter Benjamin: future exists as long as the present finds its mission in regaining derailed futures embedded in the past. Our totally corrupt world needs to be redeemed. The Russian silent movie was already a far cry in the 1910s, but not the silent cry of fear, like in German expressionism, but the cry of rage.

  • Print-ISBN-13: 978-963-236-347-9
  • Page Count: 325
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Language: Hungarian