Invisible Aggression: The Force Fields of the Invisible Presence of State Security and the System of their Concepts of Enemy – Possibilities of Interpretation and Analysis Cover Image
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Láthatatlan erőszak. Az állambiztonsági szervek láthatatlan jelenlétének erőterei és ellenségképeinek rendszere – értelmezési és elemzési lehetőségek
Invisible Aggression: The Force Fields of the Invisible Presence of State Security and the System of their Concepts of Enemy – Possibilities of Interpretation and Analysis

Author(s): Kriszta Slachta
Subject(s): Social history, Post-War period (1950 - 1989), History of Communism
Published by: KORALL Társadalomtörténeti Egyesület
Keywords: history;state security;stasi;

Summary/Abstract: The study explores research on the history of East German and Hungarian state security to find the possible conceptual frameworks of interpreting invisible aggression in communist dictatorships, and to analyze the existing theoretical and methodological paradigms and their possibilities. From the 1960s onwards, state security in the Eastern European countries of the Soviet Bloc not only progressed in the field of surveillance and interrogation techniques but using nuanced evidence and argument they developed an increasingly sophisticated definition and concept of the enemy. At the same time, the distance between the enemies of state security and the state itself grew, and the system of interests of both state and state security diverged. In the 1950s, state violence was practiced either openly or in secret (but known to all members of society), which was gradually replaced by increasingly sophisticated methods of psychological violence. State security control was no longer directed at the “enemies” of the system – real or imagined – but was widened to “cover” all of society and all walks of life: from the workplace, culture, and education to leisure, living spaces, and institutions, as well as the movement and permitted travel – of the whole population.

  • Issue Year: 2020
  • Issue No: 79
  • Page Range: 49-65
  • Page Count: 17
  • Language: Hungarian