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Czech Church Slavonic Texts with Latin Originals
Czech Church Slavonic Texts with Latin Originals

Author(s): Miroslav Veprek
Subject(s): Language and Literature Studies
Published by: Slovanský ústav Akademie věd ČR, v. v. i. and Euroslavica
Keywords: Czech Church Slavonic; translating methods; Latin; Bohemia 10th-11th centuries; Old Czech

Summary/Abstract: The contribution is devoted to Church Slavonic texts of Czech origin that were translated from Latin in the 10th and 11th centuries. It reflects current state of study in this issue including namely the newly found Latin parallels of Church Slavonic texts (prayers of the Jaroslavl Prayerbook) or studies and monographs on the Legend of St. Anastasia. The lately published Forty Gospel Homilies of St. Gregory the Great and so-called Second Church Slavonic Life of St. Wenceslas are considered as representative texts for philological comparison. Beside these, attention is also paid to the texts the Czech origin of which is dubious (e.g. the Pseudo- Gospel of Nicodeme) and to the texts to which there is still no widely accepted Latin parallel. In its analytical part, the treatise deals with translating techniques reflected in stylistic, morphological (namely the translation of Latin verb forms) and syntactic (the way absolute case constructions are translated) levels are dealt with. Author analyzes the ways lexis of Latin original is reflected in the translations and, using lexical correspondences, describes mutual relations of individual Church Slavonic texts. Continuing the research of A. I. Sobolevskij and others, author studies hypotheses of common features of individual translations and of their possible origin in one translating school. The aim of the treatise is to offer the survey of Church Slavonic texts of Czech origin that were translated from Latin, including those where the Latin origin is hypothetical to a certain extent, and to describe characteristic features of translating methods that developed in Bohemia in the 10th and 11th centuries.

  • Issue Year: LXXXII/2013
  • Issue No: 1+2
  • Page Range: 240-250
  • Page Count: 11
  • Language: Czech